Reclaiming the Legacy: Martin Luther King Day March in Oakland

January 19, 2015 – Reclaiming King’s Legacy: A Jobs & Economy March for the People. Organized by the Anti Police-Terrorism Project (APTP) in Oakland, CA

I AM A MAN

Black Lives Matter

POC Youth

Silence equals Violence

White Silence is Violence

Silence is betrayal. Photo: Wendy Goodfriend

Women of Color Killed by Police Brutality

Third World for Black Power

The masses marching in Oakland

Power Concedes Nothing Without Demand

Black Lives Matter. Photo: Wendy Goodfriend

End Mass Incarceration. Photo: Wendy Goodfriend

The masses with signage

Hey Libby

The March at Oakland Coliseum BART

The March at Oakland Coliseum BART

The March at Oakland Coliseum BART

The March at Oakland Coliseum BART

Don't Shoot! Photo: Wendy Goodfriend

End Police Violence. Photo: Wendy Goodfriend

May Day – Occupy Oakland Rally (videos)

Videos from the May Day Occupy Oakland rally on May 1, 2012

May Day General Strike at Occupy Oakland — Oscar Grant Plaza (aka Frank Ogawa Plaza) in downtown Oakland, CA.

After a standoff with the Oakland Police May Day Occupy Oakland protestors retreat to OGP and protest through song — a protestor speaks directly into the camera.

Speakers at the May Day Occupy Oakland rally:

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Boots Riley:

Hillary Clinton’s Speech to the UN on LGBT Rights

Hillary Clinton: “So in that spirit, I want to talk about the difficult and important issues we must address together to reach a global consensus that recognizes the human rights of LGBT citizens everywhere.”

Hillary Clinton speaks to UN about LGBT Rights on Dec.6, 2011Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton — Remarks in Recognition of International Human Rights Day December 6, 2011 Palais des Nations Geneva, Switzerland

“So in that spirit, I want to talk about the difficult and important issues we must address together to reach a global consensus that recognizes the human rights of LGBT citizens everywhere.”

The first issue goes to the heart of the matter. Some have suggested that gay rights and human rights are separate and distinct; but, in fact, they are one and the same. Now, of course, 60 years ago, the governments that drafted and passed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights were not thinking about how it applied to the LGBT community. They also weren’t thinking about how it applied to indigenous people or children or people with disabilities or other marginalized groups. Yet in the past 60 years, we have come to recognize that members of these groups are entitled to the full measure of dignity and rights, because, like all people, they share a common humanity.”

“This recognition did not occur all at once. It evolved over time. And as it did, we understood that we were honoring rights that people always had, rather than creating new or special rights for them. Like being a woman, like being a racial, religious, tribal, or ethnic minority, being LGBT does not make you less human. And that is why gay rights are human rights, and human rights are gay rights.”